Review Wasted by Kate Tempest at Sherman Cymru by Chelsey Gillard

wasted 2

Wasted

By Kate Tempest

At Sherman Cymru, Theatre 2

23rd March 2013

Once in a while a production will come along that creates a huge buzz. When you miss a show like that you know that there’s usually no way you’ll ever get to see it. Luckily for those who missed it first time round Wasted came back for a second nationwide tour. If you missed it this time you really have missed out!

Three friends, who are maybe more than friends and maybe less, are forced to face up to all the opportunities they wasted because they were…..well, wasted. On the tenth anniversary of their childhood friend’s death they ask what went wrong and how can I make it right. But is the middle of a rave in South London really the place for these twenty five year olds to make a change for the better?

The pace of this short play is staggering, during the twenty-four hours we follow the three disillusioned Londoners no part of their lives is left unexamined. Why doesn’t downtrodden Ted (Cary Crankson)leave his Ikea loving girlfriend and get the job of his dreams? When will Danny (Bradley Taylor) realise his band is going nowhere? And how did Charlotte (Lizzy Watts) fall out of love with her calling to be a teacher?

Written by performance poet and rapper Kate Tempest, her theatrical debut is nothing short of amazing. Tempest has a way of bending words to make them fit into her beautiful urban poetry that never once sounds forced or insincere. In fact her down to earth and rhythmic approach to word play ensures the production is hard hitting, honest and true.

Naturalistic scenes in parks, cafes and clubs are broken up by bare-all monologues and stylised choral scenes directed straight at the audience that are worthy of any music stage. The actors do an absolutely stunning job of navigating the rhythms and layers of Tempest’s words, slipping effortlessly between their characters everyday life and the choreographed group sections.

As if there wasn’t enough to be entertained by already the innovative use of multimedia added yet another level to the polished show. A large screen provided clues to the setting of each scene; a neon sign telling us the cafe is open or a beautifully shot pub interior. During the powerful monologues the screen showed close ups of the actor’s face that were cleverly matched to the onstage lighting and added yet more emotion to the already intense words.

A beautiful symphony of words, music and technology. This is the kind of theatre that gets people excited, makes them talk and inspires them to make a change. The innovative combinations of media and poetry make this rather straightforward study of modern urban life something unmissable. Let’s hope they will be back by popular demand for a third outing soon!

A Paine’s Plough, Birmingham Repertory Theatre and Roundhouse production, in association with the National Student Drama Festival and Latitude Festival.

For more about the show and producers Paine’s Plough: www.painesplough.com

For more on Kate Tempest: www.katetempest.co.uk

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